Theological Fighting Trim–The Morning Workouts

Image result for boxer and punching bag

If there were world records for such a category, I would be the world’s most unathletic person ever.  The advancing years have not changed that in the least.  Lacking speed, skill, co-ordination, height, weight, accuracy, perseverance, endurance, body build, and competitiveness, I have been content to do less than sit on the sidelines.  I have skipped the games and contests all together.  To make matters worse, I know almost nothing of sports events.  I don’t watch any sports networks, although I did happen to see a whole quarter of a football game this past fall.

I can never tell you which baseball team is in the Superbowl or what football team is playing the world series or what state the Olympics are in this year.

Sports does help me in one way, however.  Sports makes for good metaphors.  The Apostle Paul used them often, and I suspect he may have been a grappler. (At least Johannes Brandup, as Paul, puts up a pretty good match against his Sadducee friend in the movie Paul the Apostle.)  So I use, in this case, a boxing metaphor to describe–once again–some of my most sedentary habits of the morning hours.  Calling it training and thinking of it in terms of a boxer makes me feel a bit more active.  Such thoughts can be fine substitutes for exertion.

Besides, aren’t you tired of pictures and discussions like the one below?

Image result for morning coffee and theology

Isn’t this more interesting and enticing?  And wouldn’t it lure more of you into buying and reading the books I am promoting?

Image result for athlete in training

Still, truth be known, my morning routine is rather staid, quiet, and unexciting.  But for various reasons, I love it all the same.  That being the case, I would like to share a few of the recent titles I have been working on.  In some cases, I am reading straight through the books.  In some cases, I am reading a little here and a little there.  The morning reads are all devoted to the broad topic of theology, or perhaps Bible study, or Bible related readings.  As always, I do not venture in without the staple of strong, black coffee at my side.  Until summer comes along, I only have an hour for these reading jaunts.  With my flitting mind, I usually read a chapter or ten or so pages from one book and then venture on to another.

Image result for the unseen realm heiser

The Unseen Realm: Rediscovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible by Michael Heiser is published byLexham Press.  (If you have not yet discovered Lexham Press, you are missing out on lots of great books.)  I acquired this book after hearing it praised by P. Andrew Sandlin and Brian Godawa.  It is almost unique among books that I have been familiar with.

The main point of the book is that there are passages and ideas contained in the Bible that are challenging, hard to understand, and often ignored. In these cases, it is because the verses support a supernatural worldview that doesn’t fit well into much of our conventional theology.  At first glance, one might think, “Oh, another weird book by some glassy eyed Bible student who claims to have uncovered some ‘overlooked truths’ of the Bible.”  In other words, another book like the bizarre numerology Bible books that surfaced (and hopefully sunk) some time ago.

If this book is out-of-the-box weird, I have not detected it.  So far, it is very careful and Bible-grounded.  I try to avoid cutting and pasting blurbs and comments from the web-site, but please consider what is written below:

The psalmist declared that God presides over an assembly of divine beings (Psa. 82:1). Who are they? What does it mean when those beings participate in God’s decisions (1 Kings 22:19–23)? Why wasn’t Eve surprised when the serpent spoke to her? Why are Yahweh and his Angel fused together in Jacob’s prayer (Gen. 48:15–16)? How did descendants of the Nephilim (Gen. 6:4) survive the flood (Num. 13:33)? What are we to make of Peter and Jude’s belief in imprisoned spirits (2 Pet. 2:4; Jude 6)? Why does Paul describe evil spirits in terms of geographical rulership (thrones, principalities, rulers, authorities)? Who are the “glorious ones” that even angels dare not rebuke (2 Pet. 2:10–11)?

The Unseen Realm presents the fruit of Dr. Heiser’s fifteen years of research into what the Bible really says about the unseen world of the supernatural. His goal is to help readers view the biblical text unfiltered by tradition or by theological presuppositions.

I will keep you updated on this book.  So far–130 pages into it–it is really good.

Image result for n. t. wright the day the revolution began

Count me as a “Johnny come lately” to the surge of interest in the theology and books of N. T. Wright.  Don’t count me as a total novice or bumpkin, however.  I did hear the man speak at an event some years ago, and I stood in a small circle next to the tall bishop.  Much that defines his theological paradigm slips past me.  I have read some really helpful things from him, and some of what I have read, I did not find convincing.  In recent months, I did find his book Surprised By Hope very edifying, and from the 50 to 80 pages I have read in The Day the Revolution Began, I can give this book whole-hearted approval.

Much of what Wright writes (that is right) concerns how we have heard and embraced ideas that are not totally lined up with the Bible.  Jesus’ mission in its ultimate competed purpose is not so that we can dwell in an ethereal, body-less state in a heavenly realm.  Going to heaven is only one part of the Christian’s future expectations.  God is re-creating and re-fashioning and redeeming heaven and earth.  After all, our frequent prayer that God’s will be “done on earth as it is in heaven” is command and promise and certainty, and not mere wishful thinking.

Image result for spurgeon sermons in candles

I first starting reading Sermons in Candles by Charles H. Spurgeon last week when I was out of town.  I wanted a morning read that would be good, but lighter than usual.  This book was perfect.  Only Charles Spurgeon could take the then common concept of candles and use them to illustrate and illuminate a wide number of Christian applications.  Spurgeon references Scripture, books of all sorts, examples of famous Christians, and every day experiences in the 170 pages of humorous, instructive, convicting, and edifying reading.

I owe an increasing debt to Ruben Alvarado for his publishing so many good books at Pancrator Press/Wordbridge Publishing.  But Ruben has written several books himself, and Calvin and the Whigs is his latest work.  Understand that if you are needing a light, enjoyable read, try the Spurgeon book above (and don’t feel bad for swimming in the shallow end of the pool).  This book, however, calls for some slow reading and serious attention.  Note that this is A Study in Historical Political Theology.  Four words in that subtitle should serve as a warning that this book calls for some seriously hot and strong coffee.

I must confess to my own way of reading the book.  First, I read it from start to finish.  Well, almost.  Actually, I read about half or more and then skipped over to the conclusion and read it.  Then I went back and finished reading the book, including a second reading of the conclusion.  Then today (May 18), I started the book again from the beginning.

To give some spoilers (!), the great concern in this book is the way that Christian political theology (as exemplified by Calvin, Augustine, Althusius, and others) has been submerged from political discussions.  In its place, the teachings of John Locke have been posited as the founding ideas that impacted political theology in Britain and America.  The title subtly alludes to Herbert Butterfield’s book The Whig Interpretation of History.  (To my shame, I have only recently acquired and have not yet read this classic work on historiography.)

Image result for the whig interpretation of history

This book includes an examination of Augustine’s political theory, Calvin’s, and the contradictory ideas of Hugo Grotius.  Yes, I am intimidated, but no, I am not willing to let this book escape my understanding.

Upcoming Matches

Image result for wrestling team

The battles never end.  I have some great books lining up for upcoming matches.  There is no way I will get through this gauntlet without getting some major bruises and possibly a broken bone or two.  I guess I have become a glutton for punishment, but I look forward to hitting and, in return, getting hit by these books.

Reading the Bible Supernaturally: Seeing and Savoring the Glory of God in Scripture - By: John Piper

Don’t be fooled by John Piper’s pleasant and easy-going style.  The man trained under Jonathan Edwards, taught in a seminary, and knows the Bible. Reading the Bible Supernaturally should be quite good.

Image result for Reformation Theology: A Systematic Summary

Reformation Theology: A Systematic Summary is a big, hefty book that promises to be a cross country marathon with weight-lifting during the breaks.  Very timely for this the year to celebrate Reformation 500.

Contours of the Kuyperian Tradition

I like Craig Bartholomew’s writings and I love Abraham Kuyper.  This book is a dream read.  So glad that it is on hand and awaiting the moment when the pages start to turn.  Contours of the Kuyperian Tradition is an IVP publication.

Image result for logia christology david scaer

Beware the little book.  Short and easily carried about, I suspect this book will pack a punch.  For one thing, I have little understanding of the contributions and ideas developed among Lutheran theologians (including Brother Martin himself).  And if I make it through Christology by David Scaer, I suspect I will want to have a go at the other volumes in this series.

On the way

How can I rest knowing that Beyond Calvin: Essays on the Diversity of the Reformed Tradition is soon going to show up, primed and ready for action?  Thankful to now be acquainted with Davenant Trust and looking forward to some real work-outs with this book and others.

Image result for lone runner

All of these athletic metaphors and images have worn me out.  I simply must go and take a nap.

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