James V. Schall’s Books

No photo description available.

Below is a list of books that were written by Father James V. Schall.  This is the list that he sent me some time back.  His death last week (April 17, 2019) has saddened me.  Thankfully, his life and legacy have not ended.  I have read and collected quite a few, but not all, of his books.  My goal is to own them all and read them all.

BOOKS:

1) REDEEMING THE TIME. NEW YORK: SHEED & WARD 1968.

2) HUMAN DIGNITY AND HUMAN NUMBERS. STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.: ALBA HOUSE 1971.

3) PLAY ON: FROM GAMES TO CELEBRATIONS. PHILADELPHIA: FORTRESS  PRESS 1971.

4) FAR TOO EASILY PLEASED: A THEOLOGY OF PLAY, CONTEMPLATION, AND FESTIVITY. LOS ANGELES: BENZIGER/MACMILLAN 1976.

5) THE PRAISE OF ‘SONS OF BITCHES’: ON THE WORSHIP OF GOD BY FALLEN

MEN. SLOUGH, ENGLAND: ST. PAUL PUBLICATIONS 1978.

6) THE SIXTH PAUL. CANFIELD, Oh: ALBA BOOKS 1977.

7) WELCOME NUMBER 4,000.000,000. CANFIELD, Oh.: ALBA BOOKS 1977.

8) CHRISTIANITY AND LIFE. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1981.

9) LIBERATION THEOLOGY. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1982.

10) CHURCH, STATE, AND SOCIETY IN THE THOUGHT OF JOHN PAUL II.  CHICAGO: FRANCISCAN HERALD PRESS 1982.

11) THE DISTINCTIVENESS OF CHRISTIANITY. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1983.

12) THE POLITICS OF HEAVEN AND HELL: CHRISTIAN THEMES FROM CLASSICAL, MEDIEVAL, AND MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, LANHAM, MD.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA 1984.

13) UNEXPECTED MEDITATIONS LATE IN THE XXTH CENTURY. CHICAGO: FRANCISCAN HERALD PRESS 1985.

14) REASON, REVELATION, AND THE FOUNDATIONS OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, BATON ROUGE: LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS

1987.

15) ANOTHER SORT OF LEARNING, SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1988.

16) RELIGION, WEALTH, AND POVERTY, VANCOUVER, B. C.: FRASER INSTITUTE 1990.

17) WHAT IS GOD LIKE? COLLEGEVILLE, Mn.: MICHAEL

GLAZER/LITURGICAL PRESS 1992.

18) IDYLLS AND RAMBLES: LIGHTER CHRISTIAN ESSAYS. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1994.

19) DOES CATHOLICISM STILL EXIST? STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.: ALBA HOUSE 1994.

20) AT THE LIMITS OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: FROM “BRILLIANT ERRORS”

TO THINGS OF UNCOMMON IMPORTANCE. WASHINGTON: THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PRESS 1996.

21) JACQUES MARITAIN: THE PHILOSOPHER IN SOCIETY. LANHAM, Md.:  ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD 1998.

22) SCHALL ON CHESTERTON: TIMELY ESSAYS ON TIMELESS PARADOXES. WASHINGTON, D. C.: THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PRESS 2000.

23) A STUDENTS’ GUIDE TO LIBERAL LEARNING. WILMINGTON, De.: ISI  BOOKS 2000.

24) REASON, REVELATION, AND HUMAN AFFAIRS: SELECTED WRITINGS OF JAMES V. SCHALL, EDITED WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY MARC GUERRA.

LANHAM, Md: LEXINGTON BOOKS 2001.

25) THE UNSERIOUSNESS OF HUMAN AFFAIRS: TEACHING, WRITING, PLAYING, BELIEVING, LECTURING, PHILOSOPHIZING, SINGING, DANCING. WILMINGTON, De.: ISI BOOKS 2002.

26) ROMAN CATHOLIC POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. LANHAM, Md.: LEXINGTON BOOKS 2004. (ITALIAN TRANSLATION: LA FILOSOFIA POLITICA DELLA CHIESA CATTOLICA. SIENA: CANTAGALLI 2011).

27) THE LIFE OF THE MIND. WILMINGTON, De: ISI BOOKS 2006.

28) SUM TOTAL OF HUMAN HAPPINESS. SOUTH BEND, In.: ST. AUGUSTINE’S PRESS 2006.

29) THE REGENSBURG LECTURE. SOUTH BEND, In.: ST. AUGUSTINE’S PRESS 2007.

30) THE ORDER OF THINGS. San Francisco: Ignatius Press 2007.

31) MIND THAT IS CATHOLIC. Washington: The Catholic University of America Press 2008.

32) THE MODERN AGE. South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s Press 2011..

33) RATIONAL PLEASURES, San Francisco: Ignatius Press 2013.

34) REMEMBERING BELLOC. South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s Press 2013.

35) ATHENS, JERUSALEM, AND ROME: ESSAYS IN HONOR OF JAMES V SCHAL, S. J. Edited by Marc Guerra. South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s Press 2013.

36) POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY & REVELATION: A CATHOLIC VIEW. Washington: The Catholic University of America Press 2013.

37) THE CLASSICAL MOMENT: ESSAYS IN KNOWLEDGE AND ITS PLEASURES, South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s Press 2014.

38) ON CHRISTIANS AND PROSPERITY, Grand Rapids, Mi., The Acton Institute 2015.

39) DOCILITY: ON TEACHING AND BEING TAUGHT. South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s  Press 2016.

40) A LINE THROUGH THE HUMAN HEART: ON SINNING AND BEING FORGIVEN.  Kettering, Oh.: Angelico Press 2016.

41) CATHOLICISM AND INTELLIGENCE. Steubenville, Oh.: Emmaus Road Publishing  2017.

42) THE SATISFIED CROCODILE: ESSAYS ON G. K. CHESTERTON The American  Chesterton Society (Charlotte, N. C.: ACS Books 2017.

43) THE UNIVESE WE THINK IN. Washington: The Catholic University of America Press  2018.

44) ON ISLAM: A CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD 2002-2018. San Francisco: Ignatius  Press 2018).

EDITED WITH INTRODUCTION:..

THE WHOLE TRUTH ABOUT MAN: JOHN PAUL II TO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS AND FACULTIES. BOSTON: ST. PAUL EDITIONS, 1981.

SACRED IN ALL ITS FORMS: ESSAYS OF JOHN PAUL II, BOSTON: ST. PAUL EDITIONS, 1984.

PASTORALS ON WAR OF THE GERMAN AND FRENCH BISHOPS, OUT OF

JUSTICE, PEACE. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1984.

G. K. CHESTERTON, COLLECTED WORKS, VOL. IV, WHAT’S WRONG WITH THE WORLD. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1986.

WITH JEROME J. HANUS, STUDIES IN RELIGION AND POLITICS. LANHAM, Md.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA 1986.

ON THE INTELLIGIBILITY OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: ESSAYS OF CHARLES N. R. MCCOY, EDITED BY JAMES V. SCHALL AND JOHN J. SCHREMS. WASHINGTON: THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PRESS 1989.

WITH GEORGE CAREY, ESSAYS IN CHRISTIANITY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.

LANHAM, MD.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA 1984.

The Lost Prince: A Search for Pat Conroy by Michael Meshaw

See the source image

I confess:  I am a literary romantic.  I really want to believe that great writers live in a paradise of books, good music, poetry, and fine conversations with other literary people, punctuated by long periods of sitting in a perfect setting writing words that will last forever.  Reading about literary greats punches gaping holes in that myth.  All the way back to my high school days, I read biographies of writers.  Some writers led incredibly dull lives that were tied mostly to them pecking away on typewriters or filling pages with ink.  Others lived lives that were more adventurous and harrowing than their books.  Hemingway was not a nice guy, although he might have been fun to go fishing with.  Faulkner would not have been easy to sit around with and talk about literature, but that would not have been impossible.  Robert Frost could be downright mean and devious.  All too many writers were drunkards.

Pat Conroy was a man with real literary gifts.  He could write prose that soared.  Maybe more than most writers, his fiction was autobiographical.  And then much of his autobiographical material was fictitious. He was outgoing, fun, generous, and loveable, but he was also morose, cruel, and mentally messed up.  I tend to view his books overall as being good, but not great literature. He could weave a fine story.  He could make a reader laugh, cry, and feel the stunning weight of beautiful language.

This past several months, I have occasion to read and write several times about Conroy.  I read and loved the book Our Prince of Scribes which was compiled by a number of friends and fellow writers who shared memories of Conroy.  More than any other writer I have read about, Conroy encouraged, promoted, and pushed other writers.  He really loved helping others.  More than most writers, he really loved his fans.  Rather than eschewing crowds, he was empowered by them.  He would sit and autograph books and listen to fans for hours.  That is the Conroy man that I love.

I also read his posthumous book A Lowcountry Heart: Reflections on a Writing Life.  Many of the essays were wonderful.  This book is quite similar in approach to his book My Reading Life.  Anyone wanting to enjoy books by a writer about reading and writing will enjoy these.  I ran up and down our school hall shouting the day I realized that I had an autographed copy of My Reading Life.

The Lost Prince, published by Counterpoint, is by Michael Meshaw, who is also a writer and was a close, maybe even the best friend, of Conroy.  This book is a delightful story in many ways about the ups and downs of the writing life.  Both the Meshaws and the Conroys were living in Rome; both Mike and Pat (begging pardon for this informality) were working on novels; both found lots of similarities in their life experiences.  However, Conroy was writing best-selling books that were being turned into movies while Meshaw’s works were less successful.

As always, Conroy was supportive of his friend.  That sometimes meant Conroy would make use of contacts to help Meshaw or would lavish him with gifts.  All this is the positive side of the friendship.  These two guys really did have some heart-to-heart shared thoughts, experiences, and vision.  But Pat Conroy was a combustible figure.  Much of the book is about how Conroy’s marriage to Lenore (his second wife) bounced from battle to battle.  Sometimes, the battles were with Lenore’s ex-husband, while often the conflicts were between Conroy and his wife.

Life in Rome was followed by times when the Conroys would move to Atlanta, Georgia or to California, or to Fripp Island in South Carolina.  The Meshaws lived a similarly nomadic life.  It is, once supposes, the nature of writers to be vagabonds in many cases.  The friendship and comradeship would wax and wane for years, but after Conroy and Lenore divorced, the Meshaws were estranged from Pat.

This book is a sad reflection of a lost and never-ending painful separation.  Granted, this is only Mike’s side of the story, but it seems that Pat was down-right cruel, manipulative, vindictive, and evil toward ex-friends and ex-family members.  Added to that, Pat’s tendency toward alcoholism, toward suicidal thoughts, toward sadistic behavior compounded the problems.

In short, Pat Conroy didn’t mind living in fiction as well as writing it.  It hurts to realize that the wonderful man described by friends in Our Prince of Scribes was also the mean man described by Mike Meshaw.  This is a story of love and friendship, but, boy, it hurts.

Preaching is not always appreciated, but I will venture to preach a bit in closing.  Pat Conroy needed to experience God’s grace.  He had a horrific upbringing with an abusive father and a deceptive mother.  He was a flawed human being.  He could be brave and bold with a willingness to fight for right.  But he never found the peace in his heart to deal with his past or to acknowledge his own sins to others.  Since Michael Meshaw was not close by during Pat’s last days, perhaps there were reconciliations and repentances.  One can only hope.

The lives of writers often fall short of their fiction.  Perhaps the same can be said of those of us who are teachers, preachers, and people in other professions. It is the greatness of man interwoven with the flaws of man that keeps us searching and thinking.  Only Jesus of Nazareth was perfect in every way.  The rest of us, whether we are lost princes or lost serfs, are still lost and in need of something greater than mere human improvement.

The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers

Dorothy Sayers is, in my world, the lady who wrote the essay. I am referring to “The Lost Tools of Learning,” which Miss Sayers wrote in 1947 and delivered at Oxford University.  Like quite a few other people, I read it several decades later, and slowly, it began to change my whole approach to education.  That essay is the founding document in the classical Christian school movement in America.  It doesn’t say everything that needs to be said about education in general or classical education more specifically, but it said enough to spark thought, debate, and, more important, application.

That essay was just a sliver of the corpus of writing that Dorothy Sayers did in her lifetime (1893-1957).  Her main means of support was writing mysteries, and her main characters in her stories were Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane.  Lest one think that this was just pot-boiling writing to make a buck, take note that she was one of the founding members of the Detection Club.  She also served as president of that organization of mystery writers, being preceded by G. K. Chesterton, author of the Father Brown stories, and succeeded by Agatha Christi.

She was also an incredibly gifted theological writer.  Her contemporaries were such fellows as C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and others among the famed Inklings. I am not sure she was ever able to hang out with the guys, but she could have more than held her own trading wit and wisdom with those writers of Christian thought and imagination.  Her theological books blend deep convictions about doctrine with a worldview that applies the faith to art and all of life.  Not as wittily quotable as Lewis, she was still quite bold, profound, and solid.

In her own personal life, she battled quite a few issues.  She got a degree from Oxford at a time when such a thing was unheard of for a woman.  Her personal life was full of struggles, both from her own bad choices and from other circumstances, but she persevered and made her own niche in English letters.

Plough Publishing House has produced a series of books with titles beginning with the words The Gospel in….  Authors whose works have been chosen for this series include Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, George MacDonald, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Dorothy L. Sayers. As the subtitle of The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers states, this book is made up of “Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays.”

This book is a marvelous way to either get acquainted with Dorothy Sayers or to renew and enrich that acquaintance.  Reading her books would involve taking quite a few mystery novels, a number of theologically-centered plays, several books of theology, some translations of classics (like The Song of Roland and Dante’s Divine Comedy), and reading her letters.  This is not to say that they are all here in this volume, but it is a great selection of bits and pieces of her mysteries, without any fatal spoilers, and portions of her other writings.

The book consists of twenty chapters, preceded by a biographical sketch and followed by short essay about Sayers by C. S. Lewis. The chapters are mostly named for her mystery novels, and then the selections begin with something from a novel, followed by non-fictional writings on the same topic.  Topics include conscience, sin and grace, covetousness, forgiveness, judgment, and more.

Let me confess something:  I have failed greatly in not reading or appreciating enough of Dorothy Sayers’ writings.  My response to the chapters of this book as I read it in the mornings (usually) is one of lament and regret over having ignored her.  As I said in the beginning, my Sayers’ experience has been centered on that one brilliant essay, “The Lost Tools of Learning.”  This book is a marvelous means of literary repentance for me.

I love this whole series of books by Plough Publishing House.  I hope they do more books of this type.  So many writers have structured their books around Gospel themes.  Even unbelieving authors resort to sin and grace, forgiveness and redemption, fall and restoration in their stories.  Literature is a bulwark of Christian history and apologetics.

Books like this one, The Gospel in Dorothy Sayers, are great tools for students and teachers.  Forget that statement.  It sounds much too serious.  This book is great fun to read and is packed full of plenty that will nurture the soul and create an appetite for reading more of Dorothy Sayers.

Image may contain: 2 people