James V. Schall’s Books

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Below is a list of books that were written by Father James V. Schall.  This is the list that he sent me some time back.  His death last week (April 17, 2019) has saddened me.  Thankfully, his life and legacy have not ended.  I have read and collected quite a few, but not all, of his books.  My goal is to own them all and read them all.

BOOKS:

1) REDEEMING THE TIME. NEW YORK: SHEED & WARD 1968.

2) HUMAN DIGNITY AND HUMAN NUMBERS. STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.: ALBA HOUSE 1971.

3) PLAY ON: FROM GAMES TO CELEBRATIONS. PHILADELPHIA: FORTRESS  PRESS 1971.

4) FAR TOO EASILY PLEASED: A THEOLOGY OF PLAY, CONTEMPLATION, AND FESTIVITY. LOS ANGELES: BENZIGER/MACMILLAN 1976.

5) THE PRAISE OF ‘SONS OF BITCHES’: ON THE WORSHIP OF GOD BY FALLEN

MEN. SLOUGH, ENGLAND: ST. PAUL PUBLICATIONS 1978.

6) THE SIXTH PAUL. CANFIELD, Oh: ALBA BOOKS 1977.

7) WELCOME NUMBER 4,000.000,000. CANFIELD, Oh.: ALBA BOOKS 1977.

8) CHRISTIANITY AND LIFE. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1981.

9) LIBERATION THEOLOGY. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1982.

10) CHURCH, STATE, AND SOCIETY IN THE THOUGHT OF JOHN PAUL II.  CHICAGO: FRANCISCAN HERALD PRESS 1982.

11) THE DISTINCTIVENESS OF CHRISTIANITY. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1983.

12) THE POLITICS OF HEAVEN AND HELL: CHRISTIAN THEMES FROM CLASSICAL, MEDIEVAL, AND MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, LANHAM, MD.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA 1984.

13) UNEXPECTED MEDITATIONS LATE IN THE XXTH CENTURY. CHICAGO: FRANCISCAN HERALD PRESS 1985.

14) REASON, REVELATION, AND THE FOUNDATIONS OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, BATON ROUGE: LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS

1987.

15) ANOTHER SORT OF LEARNING, SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1988.

16) RELIGION, WEALTH, AND POVERTY, VANCOUVER, B. C.: FRASER INSTITUTE 1990.

17) WHAT IS GOD LIKE? COLLEGEVILLE, Mn.: MICHAEL

GLAZER/LITURGICAL PRESS 1992.

18) IDYLLS AND RAMBLES: LIGHTER CHRISTIAN ESSAYS. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1994.

19) DOES CATHOLICISM STILL EXIST? STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.: ALBA HOUSE 1994.

20) AT THE LIMITS OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: FROM “BRILLIANT ERRORS”

TO THINGS OF UNCOMMON IMPORTANCE. WASHINGTON: THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PRESS 1996.

21) JACQUES MARITAIN: THE PHILOSOPHER IN SOCIETY. LANHAM, Md.:  ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD 1998.

22) SCHALL ON CHESTERTON: TIMELY ESSAYS ON TIMELESS PARADOXES. WASHINGTON, D. C.: THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PRESS 2000.

23) A STUDENTS’ GUIDE TO LIBERAL LEARNING. WILMINGTON, De.: ISI  BOOKS 2000.

24) REASON, REVELATION, AND HUMAN AFFAIRS: SELECTED WRITINGS OF JAMES V. SCHALL, EDITED WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY MARC GUERRA.

LANHAM, Md: LEXINGTON BOOKS 2001.

25) THE UNSERIOUSNESS OF HUMAN AFFAIRS: TEACHING, WRITING, PLAYING, BELIEVING, LECTURING, PHILOSOPHIZING, SINGING, DANCING. WILMINGTON, De.: ISI BOOKS 2002.

26) ROMAN CATHOLIC POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. LANHAM, Md.: LEXINGTON BOOKS 2004. (ITALIAN TRANSLATION: LA FILOSOFIA POLITICA DELLA CHIESA CATTOLICA. SIENA: CANTAGALLI 2011).

27) THE LIFE OF THE MIND. WILMINGTON, De: ISI BOOKS 2006.

28) SUM TOTAL OF HUMAN HAPPINESS. SOUTH BEND, In.: ST. AUGUSTINE’S PRESS 2006.

29) THE REGENSBURG LECTURE. SOUTH BEND, In.: ST. AUGUSTINE’S PRESS 2007.

30) THE ORDER OF THINGS. San Francisco: Ignatius Press 2007.

31) MIND THAT IS CATHOLIC. Washington: The Catholic University of America Press 2008.

32) THE MODERN AGE. South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s Press 2011..

33) RATIONAL PLEASURES, San Francisco: Ignatius Press 2013.

34) REMEMBERING BELLOC. South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s Press 2013.

35) ATHENS, JERUSALEM, AND ROME: ESSAYS IN HONOR OF JAMES V SCHAL, S. J. Edited by Marc Guerra. South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s Press 2013.

36) POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY & REVELATION: A CATHOLIC VIEW. Washington: The Catholic University of America Press 2013.

37) THE CLASSICAL MOMENT: ESSAYS IN KNOWLEDGE AND ITS PLEASURES, South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s Press 2014.

38) ON CHRISTIANS AND PROSPERITY, Grand Rapids, Mi., The Acton Institute 2015.

39) DOCILITY: ON TEACHING AND BEING TAUGHT. South Bend, In.: St. Augustine’s  Press 2016.

40) A LINE THROUGH THE HUMAN HEART: ON SINNING AND BEING FORGIVEN.  Kettering, Oh.: Angelico Press 2016.

41) CATHOLICISM AND INTELLIGENCE. Steubenville, Oh.: Emmaus Road Publishing  2017.

42) THE SATISFIED CROCODILE: ESSAYS ON G. K. CHESTERTON The American  Chesterton Society (Charlotte, N. C.: ACS Books 2017.

43) THE UNIVESE WE THINK IN. Washington: The Catholic University of America Press  2018.

44) ON ISLAM: A CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD 2002-2018. San Francisco: Ignatius  Press 2018).

EDITED WITH INTRODUCTION:..

THE WHOLE TRUTH ABOUT MAN: JOHN PAUL II TO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS AND FACULTIES. BOSTON: ST. PAUL EDITIONS, 1981.

SACRED IN ALL ITS FORMS: ESSAYS OF JOHN PAUL II, BOSTON: ST. PAUL EDITIONS, 1984.

PASTORALS ON WAR OF THE GERMAN AND FRENCH BISHOPS, OUT OF

JUSTICE, PEACE. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1984.

G. K. CHESTERTON, COLLECTED WORKS, VOL. IV, WHAT’S WRONG WITH THE WORLD. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS 1986.

WITH JEROME J. HANUS, STUDIES IN RELIGION AND POLITICS. LANHAM, Md.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA 1986.

ON THE INTELLIGIBILITY OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: ESSAYS OF CHARLES N. R. MCCOY, EDITED BY JAMES V. SCHALL AND JOHN J. SCHREMS. WASHINGTON: THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PRESS 1989.

WITH GEORGE CAREY, ESSAYS IN CHRISTIANITY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.

LANHAM, MD.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA 1984.

The Regensburg Lecture by James V. Schall

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The Regensburg Lecture by James V. Schall is published by St. Augustine’s Press.

My initial attraction to this book was that it is written by James V. Schall.  Ever since re-reading Another Sort of Learning, I have been quite fond of Schall’s books.  Ever since reading The Classical Moment and Docilitas, I have been driven to attain and read everything Schall has written.  Ever since getting a very kind and witty answer from him after sending him an email, I have elevated him to super-hero status.  If he published his grocery shopping lists in book form, I would want to buy the book and read it. And it would be profound, funny, challenging, unexpected, and filled with quotes from Aristotle, Plato, Aquinas, and Peanuts cartoons.

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The Regensburg Lecture has a subtitle that is much like the ones found in books from a few centuries past.  It reads, “Pope Benedict XVI’s Regensburg Lecture (included in this book) called for freedom of conscience in religious matters and a reasoned debate. Not everyone agreed.”

I remember the occasion.  Pope Benedict gave a speech at a university in September 2006 that caused a firestorm in some Islamic circles.  Those people who are always appalled at any criticism of the Islamic religion were appalled, which is no surprise.  Islamic communities, which exist within the greater Islamic world, where any criticism, humor, hint of criticism, or slighting of Islamic things create volcanic reactions had…well…volcanic reactions.

In the daily or weekly sweep of news, I only knew that the Pope made a speech and riots and protests ensued.  And some in the West “wisely counseled” that the Pope had been undiplomatic and unwise in his attacks on another faith.  I also remember that some conservatives stood by the Pope and his message.

I assumed, through the years that followed, that the speech the Pope had given had included a detailed history of some of the conflicts between Islam and the West.  I have read and collected quite a few books that detail the conflicts that are not just restricted to the Crusades.  The Crusades themselves are not as cut and dried as some of the Crusade-bashing books have implied, but that is another story.  The clash of cultures has been going on with mistakes and missteps on both sides for centuries.  This in-depth historical story was, in my thinking, the gist of the Regensburg Lecture.

Then I read Schall’s book.  One hundred and thirty pages into the book, the actual lecture is in the book.  I recommend that the reader begin with Schall’s introduction and then skip over and read the speech. After that, proceed into the rest of the book.  The speech may be one of the most important speeches given in this century. (The century is still young, so we can make comparison to Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” speech or Martin Luther King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.”)

Benedict was not on a tirade or even scolding of Islam per se.  He recounted a discussion between the Byzantine Emperor Manuel II Paleologus and a Persian scholar.  The key question that the emperor raised with the Persian was the place of “compulsion in religion.” “Faith is born of the soul, not the body,” the emperor said. “Whoever would lead someone to faith needs the ability to speak well and to reason properly, without violence and threats….”

From there, the original discussion continued over the place of reason within religion.  From there, the Pope’s message focused on the history of the West, Christendom, the Christian Faith and the like to adhere to the idea that the Christian faith borrowed and made good use of Reason as taught by the Greeks.  Granted, this is a wide-ranging topic of discussion.  Many are the theologians and philosophers who have downed barrels of wine and beer and coffee hashing out the interaction between the Revelation and Reason. There are plenty of theologians who draw lines in the sand over the role of reason (or Reason) in theological thinking.  This debate crosses the borders between Protestantism (my affiliation), Catholicism (Schall’s affiliation), and Orthodoxy.  Jewish scholars, we might add, weigh in on this topic as well.  So do secular, unbelieving, and atheistic philosophers.

Therein lies the big difference.  Benedict gave a powerful and concise talk that focused on the role of reason with some focus on the fact that compulsion does not create religious followers.  Although he was the Pope at that time, he was “wearing,” figuratively speaking, professorial robes rather than ecclesiastical robes.

Schall writes, “It [the speech] was an argument that existed first of all, in true Aristotelian fashion, ‘for its own sake.’ It intended to state a truth. It claims no higher authority  but its argument for it.  Here Benedict does not say ‘believe what I say,’ or ‘this teaching is or is not in conformity with classical revelational teaching.’ Rather he says, ‘this is the argument a I understand it.’ His first task as a lecturer and our first task as readers are in the realm of intellect, of understanding what is said.”

Since September 11, 2001, our world has been flooded with books and analyses of the current confrontation(s) of the West with the Islamic World.  Those by skilled historians like Bernard Lewis, who was writing about the Middle East and related topics long before 9/11, are rich works of history and political analyses.  We been tossed to and fro by politicizing with debates over whether we can even identify the “enemy” with all Islam, with some branches of Islam, or with certain outlaw factions.

Aside from questions of who to bomb, who to ban, and who to blame, we have to have some moments of clarity and thought.  Our confrontation with terrorism is forcing us to think Worldviewishly.  What is there in the West that is so offensive for certain Islamic peoples? And what is there in the West that we are defending?

This all keeps getting back to discussions, even disagreements.  But that is what is at stake here.  There can be no compulsion in religion.  Yes, Catholics and Protestants alike have some searing failures over this from the past.  So do some harshly patriarchic fathers and domineering mothers.  So do some tyrannical pastors and church leaders.

This book and the speech it discusses is a very important work.  Thanks once again to James V. Schall for being a teacher, gentle, repetitive, learned, and clear.  Don’t skip this book.

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Summer visits from Father James V. Schall